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a Script so Perfect it’s Indecipherable

16 March, 2010

I bought this journal at a flea market in Bad Godesberg, Germany.  The elderly couple, from whom I bought the 3 Euro diary, said that even they couldn’t read the entries.  The handwriting, though tidy and uniformly cursive, is so tight that all the letters blur together and the eye loses focus (or maybe I have eyesight of a 70-year-old) .

I know of a terribly clever young lady who is well practiced in deciphering the most antiquated, untidily and, to the untrained eye, seemingly unintelligible German script.  Though this journal isn’t an 17th Century manuscript, perhaps she will demean her talent to transcribe and translate a text she will likely find easier than cherry pie.  My curiosity, and yours dear Reader, needs satisfying.  See here to learn more from said clever young lady: Dissertationis

Mit Got

I know this one! ‘With God’

Click on the images to have a closer look. Good luck!

The Diary also came with this little booklet, a laundry list? Translation and deciphering help is much welcome.

vocab journal

Vocab 1

6 Comments leave one →
  1. Anonymous permalink
    17 March, 2010 1:41 pm

    it’s a cook book! lots of egg recipes.
    LOVE \yo sis

  2. Anonymous permalink
    17 March, 2010 1:42 pm

    and you’re right, it IS german script, which is why germans living today can’t read it anymore. They stopped teaching this script in 1941.

  3. Erz permalink
    17 March, 2010 6:18 pm

    “Mit” as in “Mit gas,” the phrase I remember best from the cruise down the Danube! And I, too, know of a terribly clever young lady who is well practiced in deciphering the most antiquated, untidily and, to the untrained eye, seemingly unintelligible German script. Perhaps said young lady is a Gerbner?

  4. 17 March, 2010 8:51 pm

    Said young lady is indeed a Gerbner, who has decided to remain anonymous in her helpful comments!

  5. 21 March, 2010 2:22 pm

    There are a few really good online tutorials for Suetterlin or Kurrentschrift. I’ll make a try later today.

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